Planting a gobstopper tomato (Spring week at Wyevale Garden Centres)

Easter school holidays…many of us are into our last week of the vacation and there’s still a couple of days to fill with young children full of energy and raring to get out of the house.  Today it’s beautiful weather (for a change), making me think of gardens and the outdoors.

We’ve been doing a lot of work on our garden through the Autumn and winter ready for spring/summer.  We’ve been getting our two girls (aged 5 and 3) involved as much as possible, taking them with us to choose flowers, plants and shrubs and encouraging them to help us plant them.

Last week it was Spring Week at Wyevale Garden Centres across the country with many events taking place aimed at getting children involved in the hard and yet enjoyable work- the planting! Wyevale invited us to attend a ‘plant a gobstopper tomato’ activity at our local Wyevale centre in Altrincham.

What’s a gobstopper tomato I hear you ask? Turns out it’s a variety of tomato (and we’re looking forward to watching how they turn out!).

Our local centre is a great place to take the kids. It’s huge, has a soft play area and great cafe with packed lunch boxes for children.  We always take a trip there in the lead up to Christmas, when they have a huge variety of decorations available; they each get to choose one new decoration for the tree. They also love looking at the displays (there was a flashing unicorn last year which they were thrilled by).

The ‘plant a gobstopper tomato’ activity was well planned and we enjoyed it.  The girls were given their own pot and variety of stickers to decorate it with.  Once they’d finished this, they filled their pot with compost.

Then the best bit: they chose their gobstopper tomato plant, made a little well and hunkered it down.  Finally, they decorated and drew on a tomato ‘face’, wrote their names on and stuck this in the pot too.

We then left with two happy children with their own personalised tomato plants, plus some springtime colouring sheets.

I think it’s great to get kids involved in gardening.  It’s creative, it helps them to learn about their environment and surroundings and it gets them outdoors.

We’re leaving our plants in a sunny indoor spot while they get a bit more robust, after which they’ll be a welcome addition in our developing garden!

 

gardening tomatoes
Spot the rhubarb…and free space for tomato plants…

Disclosure: We were invited to attend Wyevale’s Spring week free of charge. All opinions are my own. 

 

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Working Mum of two, living in Didsbury, Manchester, in a house which breeds washing, mushed up raisins and various toys in the brightest primary colours. Oh, and the odd empty wine glass.

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